Lacassa
Tuesday, January 24, 2017 at 1:06PM
Mark Scarbrough in Comfort Food, Main Courses, Pasta, char sir, lacassa, macau, rice vermicelli, shrimp, stir-fry, wok

Another week, more Chinese New Year, and another recipe from adapted from FAT RICE, the cookbook for the fabulous Chicago restaurant that serves, um, "new Macau" food, the place where Bruce and I burned our faces off with an incredible hot pot curry. (I still dream about it.)

This dish isn't spicy. It's sweet and aromatic. Better still, it uses the ginger achar from our last podcast and recipe (click here). It's sweet and comforting, just what we need for our "interesting times."

If you want to hear the podcast, click here. We cook it right in front of your ears.

Otherwise, here's the recipe for our version.

Lacassa (Rice Vermicelli Stir-Fry)

Inspired by Abraham Conlon, Adrienne Lo, and Hugh Amano’s FAT RICE: RECIPES FROM THE CHICAGO RESTAURANT INSPIRED BY MACAU

Serves 2

1. Mix the soy sauce, water, sugar, salt, and white pepper in a small bowl.

2. Cover the noodles in a bowl with very hot tap water. Soak for 2 minutes—then drain in a colander set in the sink.

3. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large nonstick skillet set over medium-high heat. Add the beaten eggs; swirl the pan so they spread out across its surface. Cook about 1 minute, pulling back the sides to let raw egg run into the space once, then setting aside until the top is almost set. Loosen the edges from the skillet, then fold the omelet onto itself as you slip it out onto a cutting board. Slice it into thin strips.

4. Heat a large wok over high heat. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil, then add the onion, carrot, char siu, scallions, shrimp, and garlic. Stir-fry for 1 minute.

5. Add the drained noodles. Stir-fry 30 seconds, leave it alone 30 seconds, then stir-fry for 30 seconds

6. Drizzle the soy sauce mixture around wok; stir-fry for 15 seconds.

7. Add the sliced omelet pieces and the bean sprouts. Toss together, then remove from the heat. Garnish the with sesame oil and ginger achar.

Article originally appeared on bruceandmark (http://www.bruceandmark.com/).
See website for complete article licensing information.